A health worker holds a placard calling for free, safe, and effective Covid-19 vaccines during a protest in Manila, Philippines. Photo: Reuters A health worker holds a placard calling for free, safe, and effective Covid-19 vaccines during a protest in Manila, Philippines. Photo: Reuters
A health worker holds a placard calling for free, safe, and effective Covid-19 vaccines during a protest in Manila, Philippines. Photo: Reuters
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Why the smartest Covid-19 solutions may not be the most rational

  • The paradox is we need consensus on how to rebuild the world but rational solutions often fail with emotional, social conflict
  • The smartest solutions are those that people will accept: simple to understand, look fair, and work

A health worker holds a placard calling for free, safe, and effective Covid-19 vaccines during a protest in Manila, Philippines. Photo: Reuters A health worker holds a placard calling for free, safe, and effective Covid-19 vaccines during a protest in Manila, Philippines. Photo: Reuters
A health worker holds a placard calling for free, safe, and effective Covid-19 vaccines during a protest in Manila, Philippines. Photo: Reuters
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Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng is a former central banker and financial regulator, currently distinguished fellow at the Asia Global Institute, University of Hong Kong. He writes widely on Asian perspectives on global issues, with columns in Project Syndicate, Asia News Network and Caijing/Caixin magazines. His latest book is “Shadow Banking in China”, co-authored with Ng Chow Soon, published by Wiley.