Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro adjusts his face mask during a news conference in Brasilia, Brazil, on March 18, 2020. Under Biden, Bolsonaro’s far-right discourse is likely to fall on deaf ears. Photo: Reuters Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro adjusts his face mask during a news conference in Brasilia, Brazil, on March 18, 2020. Under Biden, Bolsonaro’s far-right discourse is likely to fall on deaf ears. Photo: Reuters
Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro adjusts his face mask during a news conference in Brasilia, Brazil, on March 18, 2020. Under Biden, Bolsonaro’s far-right discourse is likely to fall on deaf ears. Photo: Reuters
Karin Costa Vazquez
Opinion

Opinion

Karin Costa Vazquez

Trump’s defeat leaves Bolsonaro rebalancing Brazil’s relations with US and China

  • Bolsonaro’s far-right discourse is likely to fall on deaf ears in the US unless it continues to serve the broader US anti-China strategy in Latin America
  • Bolsonaro is unlikely to shift his position on China soon, though he could take a more nuanced approach and seek new trade ties elsewhere in Asia

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro adjusts his face mask during a news conference in Brasilia, Brazil, on March 18, 2020. Under Biden, Bolsonaro’s far-right discourse is likely to fall on deaf ears. Photo: Reuters Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro adjusts his face mask during a news conference in Brasilia, Brazil, on March 18, 2020. Under Biden, Bolsonaro’s far-right discourse is likely to fall on deaf ears. Photo: Reuters
Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro adjusts his face mask during a news conference in Brasilia, Brazil, on March 18, 2020. Under Biden, Bolsonaro’s far-right discourse is likely to fall on deaf ears. Photo: Reuters
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Karin Costa Vazquez

Karin Costa Vazquez

Karin Costa Vazquez is a scholar at the Centre for BRICS Studies at Fudan University and an associate professor, assistant dean and executive director of the Centre for African Latin American and Caribbean Studies at O.P. Jindal Global University, India. Previously, she was an adviser to multilateral development banks, UN agencies and governments.