A man and child wear masks in a public park in Beijing. China has not lifted its birth rate more than four years after ending the one-child policy. Photo: AP A man and child wear masks in a public park in Beijing. China has not lifted its birth rate more than four years after ending the one-child policy. Photo: AP
A man and child wear masks in a public park in Beijing. China has not lifted its birth rate more than four years after ending the one-child policy. Photo: AP
Mengni Chen
Opinion

Opinion

Mengni Chen and Paul Yip

China’s population crisis: the country might grow old before it grows rich

  • While internal migration has boosted development in parts of China, it cannot change the facts of low fertility and population ageing
  • If the fertility decline cannot be reversed, China must turn to technological innovation and other adaptations, and set a realistic population policy

A man and child wear masks in a public park in Beijing. China has not lifted its birth rate more than four years after ending the one-child policy. Photo: AP A man and child wear masks in a public park in Beijing. China has not lifted its birth rate more than four years after ending the one-child policy. Photo: AP
A man and child wear masks in a public park in Beijing. China has not lifted its birth rate more than four years after ending the one-child policy. Photo: AP
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Mengni Chen

Mengni Chen

Mengni Chen is a research scientist in the Institute of Sociology and Social Psychology at Cologne University in Germany. She is also a research officer in the Centre of Demographic Research at the University of Louvain and National Fund Institute of Scientific Research in Belgium. Her interests include marriage and family in East Asia, population dynamics and economic development, and social policies. She obtained her PhD from the University of Hong Kong in 2017.

Paul Yip

Paul Yip

Paul Yip is the founding director of the Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong, and a professor at the university's Department of Social Work and Social Administration. His interests include suicide prevention, population health and poverty research. He serves as the secretary general of the Asian Population Association and the research chair of the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong. He was a part-time member of the Central Policy Unit and a member of the Hong Kong government's Steering Committee on Population Policy.