Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha receives his AstraZeneca vaccine at government house in Bangkok, on March 16, after a delay due to blood clot fears. Photo: Government Spokesman Office via AP Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha receives his AstraZeneca vaccine at government house in Bangkok, on March 16, after a delay due to blood clot fears. Photo: Government Spokesman Office via AP
Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha receives his AstraZeneca vaccine at government house in Bangkok, on March 16, after a delay due to blood clot fears. Photo: Government Spokesman Office via AP
Philip Bowring
Opinion

Opinion

Philip Bowring

Amid Covid-19 vaccine death rumours and blood clot fears, is anyone still following the science?

  • From avoiding vaccines to halting drives, people and governments who claim to be following the science are jumping to conclusions despite a lack of evidence

Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha receives his AstraZeneca vaccine at government house in Bangkok, on March 16, after a delay due to blood clot fears. Photo: Government Spokesman Office via AP Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha receives his AstraZeneca vaccine at government house in Bangkok, on March 16, after a delay due to blood clot fears. Photo: Government Spokesman Office via AP
Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha receives his AstraZeneca vaccine at government house in Bangkok, on March 16, after a delay due to blood clot fears. Photo: Government Spokesman Office via AP
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Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring has been based in Asia for 39 years writing on regional financial and political issues. He has been a columnist for the South China Morning Post since the mid-1990s and for the International Herald Tribune from 1992 to 2011. He also contributes regularly to the Wall Street Journal, www.asiasentinel.com, a website of which he is a founder, and elsewhere. Prior to 1992 he was with the weekly Far Eastern Economic Review, latterly as editor.