The Lei Yue Mun quarantine centre shown on December 23, 2020. Recent reports suggest young children and infants are being separated from their parents when being put into mandatory quarantine. Photo: Handout The Lei Yue Mun quarantine centre shown on December 23, 2020. Recent reports suggest young children and infants are being separated from their parents when being put into mandatory quarantine. Photo: Handout
The Lei Yue Mun quarantine centre shown on December 23, 2020. Recent reports suggest young children and infants are being separated from their parents when being put into mandatory quarantine. Photo: Handout
Isabella Seif
Opinion

Opinion

Isabella Seif

Hong Kong’s coronavirus quarantine rules must have children’s best interests at heart

  • Despite government assurances, reports of young children and babies being separated from their parents in quarantine are deeply troubling
  • International law and practice can help strike a balance between preventing the spread of Covid-19 and the needs of children

The Lei Yue Mun quarantine centre shown on December 23, 2020. Recent reports suggest young children and infants are being separated from their parents when being put into mandatory quarantine. Photo: Handout The Lei Yue Mun quarantine centre shown on December 23, 2020. Recent reports suggest young children and infants are being separated from their parents when being put into mandatory quarantine. Photo: Handout
The Lei Yue Mun quarantine centre shown on December 23, 2020. Recent reports suggest young children and infants are being separated from their parents when being put into mandatory quarantine. Photo: Handout
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Isabella Seif

Isabella Seif

Isabella Seif is a lawyer specialised in public international law. She is currently conducting research at the University of Hong Kong on the application of international human rights treaties in Hong Kong and other Asian jurisdictions.