A member of the Oromo community takes part in a protest against the conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, outside the European Union offices in Pretoria, South Africa, on March 25. Photo: AP
A member of the Oromo community takes part in a protest against the conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, outside the European Union offices in Pretoria, South Africa, on March 25. Photo: AP
Kent Harrington
Opinion

Opinion

Kent Harrington

Upbeat post-pandemic forecasts mask the real dangers of political and social instability

  • Social scarring from mass tragedies doesn’t usually show up for years, and Covid-19 will be no different
  • The pandemic has ripped open economic divides that will disproportionately affect countries where tensions are already high

A member of the Oromo community takes part in a protest against the conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, outside the European Union offices in Pretoria, South Africa, on March 25. Photo: AP
A member of the Oromo community takes part in a protest against the conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, outside the European Union offices in Pretoria, South Africa, on March 25. Photo: AP
READ FULL ARTICLE