A girl wearing peony decorations visits a garden in Heze city, Shandong province, on April 8. Gender stereotypes can have an impact on a daughter’s educational achievement, which is usually a precondition for economic achievement. Photo: Xinhua A girl wearing peony decorations visits a garden in Heze city, Shandong province, on April 8. Gender stereotypes can have an impact on a daughter’s educational achievement, which is usually a precondition for economic achievement. Photo: Xinhua
A girl wearing peony decorations visits a garden in Heze city, Shandong province, on April 8. Gender stereotypes can have an impact on a daughter’s educational achievement, which is usually a precondition for economic achievement. Photo: Xinhua
Xueqing Zhang
Opinion

Opinion

Xueqing Zhang

Gender bias can be a stumbling block even for China’s beloved only-child daughters

  • Parents’ different expectations of boys and girls matter, with some research suggesting that the parents of a son are more willing to invest in the education and comfort of their child than is true for the parents of a daughter

A girl wearing peony decorations visits a garden in Heze city, Shandong province, on April 8. Gender stereotypes can have an impact on a daughter’s educational achievement, which is usually a precondition for economic achievement. Photo: Xinhua A girl wearing peony decorations visits a garden in Heze city, Shandong province, on April 8. Gender stereotypes can have an impact on a daughter’s educational achievement, which is usually a precondition for economic achievement. Photo: Xinhua
A girl wearing peony decorations visits a garden in Heze city, Shandong province, on April 8. Gender stereotypes can have an impact on a daughter’s educational achievement, which is usually a precondition for economic achievement. Photo: Xinhua
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Xueqing Zhang

Xueqing Zhang

Xueqing Zhang is a PhD student in sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on health and gender inequality, and social stratification.