A South Korean university student gets her head shaved during a protest against Japan’s decision to release contaminated water from its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, in front of the Japanese embassy, in Seoul, South Korea, on April 20. Photo: Reuters A South Korean university student gets her head shaved during a protest against Japan’s decision to release contaminated water from its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, in front of the Japanese embassy, in Seoul, South Korea, on April 20. Photo: Reuters
A South Korean university student gets her head shaved during a protest against Japan’s decision to release contaminated water from its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, in front of the Japanese embassy, in Seoul, South Korea, on April 20. Photo: Reuters
Peter Wynn Kirby
Opinion

Opinion

Peter Wynn Kirby

Fukushima waste water plan won’t win public confidence, no matter how hard Japan tries

  • The nuclear industry’s history of secrecy and cover-ups is only one reason
  • Tepco’s incompetent and at times dishonest handling so far of the 2011 disaster and its aftermath has shattered what’s left of people’s trust

A South Korean university student gets her head shaved during a protest against Japan’s decision to release contaminated water from its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, in front of the Japanese embassy, in Seoul, South Korea, on April 20. Photo: Reuters A South Korean university student gets her head shaved during a protest against Japan’s decision to release contaminated water from its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, in front of the Japanese embassy, in Seoul, South Korea, on April 20. Photo: Reuters
A South Korean university student gets her head shaved during a protest against Japan’s decision to release contaminated water from its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, in front of the Japanese embassy, in Seoul, South Korea, on April 20. Photo: Reuters
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Peter Wynn Kirby

Peter Wynn Kirby

Peter Wynn Kirby is an anthropologist, Japan expert, and environmental specialist at the University of Oxford. He writes regular opinion pieces on policy and cultural issues for a range of top newspapers and magazines. He is the author of Troubled Natures: Waste, Environment, Japan.