A solar power plant in Turpan, Xinjiang, in 2018. In China, financial system regulators can experiment with new policies without mandated restrictions. This active approach is simply not possible in the EU. Photo: Xinhua A solar power plant in Turpan, Xinjiang, in 2018. In China, financial system regulators can experiment with new policies without mandated restrictions. This active approach is simply not possible in the EU. Photo: Xinhua
A solar power plant in Turpan, Xinjiang, in 2018. In China, financial system regulators can experiment with new policies without mandated restrictions. This active approach is simply not possible in the EU. Photo: Xinhua
Mathias Lund Larsen
Opinion

Opinion

Mathias Lund Larsen

How China and the EU can work together to drive green bonds, ESG investments and sustainable finance

  • The EU’s consultative approach helps its standards to be widely adopted voluntarily, while China’s top-down approach allows policy experimentation
  • If both sides can coordinate their work, they can complement each other and push green finance forwards across the globe

A solar power plant in Turpan, Xinjiang, in 2018. In China, financial system regulators can experiment with new policies without mandated restrictions. This active approach is simply not possible in the EU. Photo: Xinhua A solar power plant in Turpan, Xinjiang, in 2018. In China, financial system regulators can experiment with new policies without mandated restrictions. This active approach is simply not possible in the EU. Photo: Xinhua
A solar power plant in Turpan, Xinjiang, in 2018. In China, financial system regulators can experiment with new policies without mandated restrictions. This active approach is simply not possible in the EU. Photo: Xinhua
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Mathias Lund Larsen

Mathias Lund Larsen

Mathias Lund Larsen is senior research consultant at the International Institute of Green Finance at the Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing and PhD Fellow at Copenhagen Business School.