A patient waits in the accident and emergency department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Yau Ma Tei, on January 6, 2019. Hong Kong has two doctors for every 1,000 people, and a consequence of this is long waiting times and short consultations. Photo: Nora Tam

A patient waits in the accident and emergency department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Yau Ma Tei, on January 6, 2019. Hong Kong has two doctors for every 1,000 people, and a consequence of this is long waiting times and short consultations. Photo: Nora Tam
A patient waits in the accident and emergency department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Yau Ma Tei, on January 6, 2019. Hong Kong has two doctors for every 1,000 people, and a consequence of this is long waiting times and short consultations. Photo: Nora Tam
Pamela Tin
Opinion

Opinion

Pamela Tin

Hong Kong has been uniquely unable to fix its doctor shortage. Why?

  • Hong Kong can no longer rely on only a licensing exam to screen foreign-trained doctors and boost the supply
  • Examples of other economies with more flexible medical registration systems are worth considering

A patient waits in the accident and emergency department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Yau Ma Tei, on January 6, 2019. Hong Kong has two doctors for every 1,000 people, and a consequence of this is long waiting times and short consultations. Photo: Nora Tam

A patient waits in the accident and emergency department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Yau Ma Tei, on January 6, 2019. Hong Kong has two doctors for every 1,000 people, and a consequence of this is long waiting times and short consultations. Photo: Nora Tam
A patient waits in the accident and emergency department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Yau Ma Tei, on January 6, 2019. Hong Kong has two doctors for every 1,000 people, and a consequence of this is long waiting times and short consultations. Photo: Nora Tam
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Pamela Tin

Pamela Tin

Dr Pamela Tin is the lead researcher in health care and ageing at Our Hong Kong Foundation.