Pedestrians crossing the road in Hong Kong’s Central district in May last year are reflected in a window. The government’s proposal to restrict information access will damage Hong Kong’s reputation as a financial centre and should not be taken lightly. Photo: May Tse Pedestrians crossing the road in Hong Kong’s Central district in May last year are reflected in a window. The government’s proposal to restrict information access will damage Hong Kong’s reputation as a financial centre and should not be taken lightly. Photo: May Tse
Pedestrians crossing the road in Hong Kong’s Central district in May last year are reflected in a window. The government’s proposal to restrict information access will damage Hong Kong’s reputation as a financial centre and should not be taken lightly. Photo: May Tse
Gordon Jones
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Gordon Jones

Open access to company registry information serves the public interest, outweighing privacy concerns

  • The government’s proposal to restrict access to information about company directors will encourage malpractice, and undermine the principles of accountability and transparency that lie at the heart of Hong Kong’s commercial life

Pedestrians crossing the road in Hong Kong’s Central district in May last year are reflected in a window. The government’s proposal to restrict information access will damage Hong Kong’s reputation as a financial centre and should not be taken lightly. Photo: May Tse Pedestrians crossing the road in Hong Kong’s Central district in May last year are reflected in a window. The government’s proposal to restrict information access will damage Hong Kong’s reputation as a financial centre and should not be taken lightly. Photo: May Tse
Pedestrians crossing the road in Hong Kong’s Central district in May last year are reflected in a window. The government’s proposal to restrict information access will damage Hong Kong’s reputation as a financial centre and should not be taken lightly. Photo: May Tse
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Gordon Jones

Gordon Jones

Gordon Jones was the registrar of companies from 1993 to 2007, during which time he modernised and computerised the Companies Registry's operations and was heavily involved in company law and corporate governance reform, including initiating the rewrite of the Companies Ordinance. He retired from the civil service in 2008 and is the author of "Corporate Governance and Compliance in Hong Kong".