An elderly woman rests in the shade of a tree at Cheung Chau island in April 2020. Hong Kong’s population is expected to fall to 7.35 million in 50 years, and nearly 40 per cent will be elderly. Photo: Winson Wong An elderly woman rests in the shade of a tree at Cheung Chau island in April 2020. Hong Kong’s population is expected to fall to 7.35 million in 50 years, and nearly 40 per cent will be elderly. Photo: Winson Wong
An elderly woman rests in the shade of a tree at Cheung Chau island in April 2020. Hong Kong’s population is expected to fall to 7.35 million in 50 years, and nearly 40 per cent will be elderly. Photo: Winson Wong
Alice Wu
Opinion

Opinion

Alice Wu

Concerned about Hong Kong’s ageing society? Start with improving quality of life for the young

  • Early prevention of chronic illnesses and boosting the birth rate require policies that tackle larger problems, such as sedentary lifestyles, long working hours, the lack of family-friendly workplaces and cramped housing

An elderly woman rests in the shade of a tree at Cheung Chau island in April 2020. Hong Kong’s population is expected to fall to 7.35 million in 50 years, and nearly 40 per cent will be elderly. Photo: Winson Wong An elderly woman rests in the shade of a tree at Cheung Chau island in April 2020. Hong Kong’s population is expected to fall to 7.35 million in 50 years, and nearly 40 per cent will be elderly. Photo: Winson Wong
An elderly woman rests in the shade of a tree at Cheung Chau island in April 2020. Hong Kong’s population is expected to fall to 7.35 million in 50 years, and nearly 40 per cent will be elderly. Photo: Winson Wong
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Alice Wu

Alice Wu

Alice Wu fell down the rabbit hole of politics aged 12, when she ran her first election campaign. She has been writing about local politics and current affairs for the Post since 2008. Alice's daily needs include her journals, books, a multi-coloured pen and several lattes.