A Somali girl drags bundles of firewood for use as fuel for cooking near Jowhar town, north of the capital Mogadishu, in October, 2015. Clean tech can help reduce the drudgery that disproportionately burdens women, such as collecting water or fuel. Photo: AFP A Somali girl drags bundles of firewood for use as fuel for cooking near Jowhar town, north of the capital Mogadishu, in October, 2015. Clean tech can help reduce the drudgery that disproportionately burdens women, such as collecting water or fuel. Photo: AFP
A Somali girl drags bundles of firewood for use as fuel for cooking near Jowhar town, north of the capital Mogadishu, in October, 2015. Clean tech can help reduce the drudgery that disproportionately burdens women, such as collecting water or fuel. Photo: AFP
Stephen Minas
Opinion

Opinion

Stephen Minas

How climate action and gender equality are linked in the pursuit of justice

  • While climate change affects everyone, existing gender inequalities often mean it has a disproportionate impact on women
  • Climate change and gender equality are everyone’s business, and we can do much more to achieve these equally necessary and mutually reinforcing goals

A Somali girl drags bundles of firewood for use as fuel for cooking near Jowhar town, north of the capital Mogadishu, in October, 2015. Clean tech can help reduce the drudgery that disproportionately burdens women, such as collecting water or fuel. Photo: AFP A Somali girl drags bundles of firewood for use as fuel for cooking near Jowhar town, north of the capital Mogadishu, in October, 2015. Clean tech can help reduce the drudgery that disproportionately burdens women, such as collecting water or fuel. Photo: AFP
A Somali girl drags bundles of firewood for use as fuel for cooking near Jowhar town, north of the capital Mogadishu, in October, 2015. Clean tech can help reduce the drudgery that disproportionately burdens women, such as collecting water or fuel. Photo: AFP
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Stephen Minas

Stephen Minas

Stephen Minas is associate professor at Peking University’s School of Transnational Law in Shenzhen, senior research fellow at King’s College London’s Transnational Law Institute and chair of the UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee. Stephen is a legal academic working mainly in the areas of climate change, sustainable finance and clean energy.