Supporters of India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party wear masks bearing the likeness of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a campaign rally ahead of elections in West Bengal on March 20, despite clear signs of a second wave of coronavirus infections. Photo: AP Supporters of India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party wear masks bearing the likeness of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a campaign rally ahead of elections in West Bengal on March 20, despite clear signs of a second wave of coronavirus infections. Photo: AP
Supporters of India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party wear masks bearing the likeness of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a campaign rally ahead of elections in West Bengal on March 20, despite clear signs of a second wave of coronavirus infections. Photo: AP
Samir Nazareth
Opinion

Opinion

Samir Nazareth

How India’s efforts to put a positive spin on its Covid-19 crisis lie at the heart of the disaster

  • The government is seeking to starve the country of stories about the lack of oxygen, hospital beds and crematorium space, and filling the vacuum with optimistic histrionics
  • Ever since the BJP announced Modi as its prime ministerial candidate in 2013, a wave of optimism has accompanied him like a dark cloud

Supporters of India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party wear masks bearing the likeness of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a campaign rally ahead of elections in West Bengal on March 20, despite clear signs of a second wave of coronavirus infections. Photo: AP Supporters of India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party wear masks bearing the likeness of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a campaign rally ahead of elections in West Bengal on March 20, despite clear signs of a second wave of coronavirus infections. Photo: AP
Supporters of India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party wear masks bearing the likeness of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a campaign rally ahead of elections in West Bengal on March 20, despite clear signs of a second wave of coronavirus infections. Photo: AP
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Samir Nazareth

Samir Nazareth

Samir Nazareth has worked in the development sector and writes on socio-political and environmental issues. He is the author of the travelogue, 1400 Bananas, 76 Towns & 1 Million People.