High school students visit Xibaipo Memorial Hall, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China, during a government-organised tour in Xibaipo in Hebei province, on May 12. Photo: Reuters High school students visit Xibaipo Memorial Hall, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China, during a government-organised tour in Xibaipo in Hebei province, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
High school students visit Xibaipo Memorial Hall, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China, during a government-organised tour in Xibaipo in Hebei province, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
Philip Bowring
Opinion

Opinion

Philip Bowring

As China’s Communist Party marks its centenary, how will it portray its history?

  • A history of the Chinese Communist Party should include the contributions of non-Chinese and acknowledge party critics, as well as celebrating the heroes through uplifting stories

High school students visit Xibaipo Memorial Hall, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China, during a government-organised tour in Xibaipo in Hebei province, on May 12. Photo: Reuters High school students visit Xibaipo Memorial Hall, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China, during a government-organised tour in Xibaipo in Hebei province, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
High school students visit Xibaipo Memorial Hall, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China, during a government-organised tour in Xibaipo in Hebei province, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
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Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring has been based in Asia for 39 years writing on regional financial and political issues. He has been a columnist for the South China Morning Post since the mid-1990s and for the International Herald Tribune from 1992 to 2011. He also contributes regularly to the Wall Street Journal, www.asiasentinel.com, a website of which he is a founder, and elsewhere. Prior to 1992 he was with the weekly Far Eastern Economic Review, latterly as editor.