A boy holds a sign during a climate change strike in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 29, 2019. The global race for net zero is like a 2050 Olympics where every city and country shows it can win, not just for its community but for the whole world. Photo: EPA-EFE A boy holds a sign during a climate change strike in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 29, 2019. The global race for net zero is like a 2050 Olympics where every city and country shows it can win, not just for its community but for the whole world. Photo: EPA-EFE
A boy holds a sign during a climate change strike in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 29, 2019. The global race for net zero is like a 2050 Olympics where every city and country shows it can win, not just for its community but for the whole world. Photo: EPA-EFE
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

World’s race for net zero carbon emissions by 2050 will require an Olympian effort

  • If the technical solutions are there and finance seems available, why is progress still slow? Blame politics
  • The race to the top on climate action between the US and China is the best thing that can happen for the planet

A boy holds a sign during a climate change strike in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 29, 2019. The global race for net zero is like a 2050 Olympics where every city and country shows it can win, not just for its community but for the whole world. Photo: EPA-EFE A boy holds a sign during a climate change strike in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 29, 2019. The global race for net zero is like a 2050 Olympics where every city and country shows it can win, not just for its community but for the whole world. Photo: EPA-EFE
A boy holds a sign during a climate change strike in Bangkok, Thailand, on November 29, 2019. The global race for net zero is like a 2050 Olympics where every city and country shows it can win, not just for its community but for the whole world. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng is a former central banker and financial regulator, currently distinguished fellow at the Asia Global Institute, University of Hong Kong. He writes widely on Asian perspectives on global issues, with columns in Project Syndicate, Asia News Network and Caijing/Caixin magazines. His latest book is “Shadow Banking in China”, co-authored with Ng Chow Soon, published by Wiley.