A student hugs her teacher at an exam centre in Guiyang, the capital of southwest China’s Guizhou province, on June 7, the first day of China’s annual college entrance exam. Photo: Xinhua A student hugs her teacher at an exam centre in Guiyang, the capital of southwest China’s Guizhou province, on June 7, the first day of China’s annual college entrance exam. Photo: Xinhua
A student hugs her teacher at an exam centre in Guiyang, the capital of southwest China’s Guizhou province, on June 7, the first day of China’s annual college entrance exam. Photo: Xinhua
Winston Mok
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Winston Mok

China can level its education playing field by letting non-profit online academies bloom

  • Over 10 million Chinese students have just taken the university entrance exams, a system that seems fair but is shot through with inequality, exacerbated by the rise of private tutoring
  • High-quality, non-profit online tutoring could help underprivileged students make the cut

A student hugs her teacher at an exam centre in Guiyang, the capital of southwest China’s Guizhou province, on June 7, the first day of China’s annual college entrance exam. Photo: Xinhua A student hugs her teacher at an exam centre in Guiyang, the capital of southwest China’s Guizhou province, on June 7, the first day of China’s annual college entrance exam. Photo: Xinhua
A student hugs her teacher at an exam centre in Guiyang, the capital of southwest China’s Guizhou province, on June 7, the first day of China’s annual college entrance exam. Photo: Xinhua
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Winston Mok

Winston Mok

Winston Mok, a private investor, was previously a private equity investor. He held senior regional positions with EMP Global and GE Capital, and was a McKinsey consultant and initiated its China practice. Winston obtained his bachelor and master degrees from MIT.