A protester holds a placard depicting Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban as Mao Zedong during a protest on June 5 against a planned Fudan University campus in Budapest. Photo: Reuters A protester holds a placard depicting Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban as Mao Zedong during a protest on June 5 against a planned Fudan University campus in Budapest. Photo: Reuters
A protester holds a placard depicting Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban as Mao Zedong during a protest on June 5 against a planned Fudan University campus in Budapest. Photo: Reuters
Andreea Brînză
Opinion

Opinion

Andreea Brînză

Where China went wrong in Central and Eastern Europe

  • Lithuania’s decision to opt out of the China-led 17+1 mechanism has laid bare participating countries’ frustrations
  • Apart from conducting relations bilaterally despite the existence of the platform, China has focused only on leaders in power, an approach that has backfired

A protester holds a placard depicting Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban as Mao Zedong during a protest on June 5 against a planned Fudan University campus in Budapest. Photo: Reuters A protester holds a placard depicting Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban as Mao Zedong during a protest on June 5 against a planned Fudan University campus in Budapest. Photo: Reuters
A protester holds a placard depicting Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban as Mao Zedong during a protest on June 5 against a planned Fudan University campus in Budapest. Photo: Reuters
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Andreea Brînză

Andreea Brînză

Andreea Brînză is vice-president of the Romanian Institute for the Study of the Asia-Pacific (RISAP). Her research focuses on the geopolitics and geoeconomics of China and especially on the Belt and Road Initiative.