French chef Laurent Veyet displays a dish in his restaurant Inoveat, which serves insect-based food, in Paris, France, on May 12. Photo: Reuters French chef Laurent Veyet displays a dish in his restaurant Inoveat, which serves insect-based food, in Paris, France, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
French chef Laurent Veyet displays a dish in his restaurant Inoveat, which serves insect-based food, in Paris, France, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

Why eating insects to combat climate change is inevitable

  • If you can suppress the ‘yuck’ reflex, insects have a smaller carbon footprint and are a good source of protein, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals
  • Growing awareness of the environmental harm of the global meat industry and rising food prices mean diet preferences will change

French chef Laurent Veyet displays a dish in his restaurant Inoveat, which serves insect-based food, in Paris, France, on May 12. Photo: Reuters French chef Laurent Veyet displays a dish in his restaurant Inoveat, which serves insect-based food, in Paris, France, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
French chef Laurent Veyet displays a dish in his restaurant Inoveat, which serves insect-based food, in Paris, France, on May 12. Photo: Reuters
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.