A couple push children in a stroller in Shanghai on June 1. Chinese mothers gave birth to 12 million babies last year, down from 14.65 million in 2019, marking an 18 per cent decline year on year. Photo: EPA-EFE  A couple push children in a stroller in Shanghai on June 1. Chinese mothers gave birth to 12 million babies last year, down from 14.65 million in 2019, marking an 18 per cent decline year on year. Photo: EPA-EFE
A couple push children in a stroller in Shanghai on June 1. Chinese mothers gave birth to 12 million babies last year, down from 14.65 million in 2019, marking an 18 per cent decline year on year. Photo: EPA-EFE
Adair Turner
Opinion

Opinion

Adair Turner

Why China’s declining population growth may be good news

  • Evidence suggests that in all prosperous countries where women are well educated and free to choose whether to have children, fertility rates fall significantly. This should be seen as a positive development
  • When populations no longer grow, there are fewer workers per retiree, but also a reduced need for infrastructure and housing investment

 A couple push children in a stroller in Shanghai on June 1. Chinese mothers gave birth to 12 million babies last year, down from 14.65 million in 2019, marking an 18 per cent decline year on year. Photo: EPA-EFE  A couple push children in a stroller in Shanghai on June 1. Chinese mothers gave birth to 12 million babies last year, down from 14.65 million in 2019, marking an 18 per cent decline year on year. Photo: EPA-EFE
A couple push children in a stroller in Shanghai on June 1. Chinese mothers gave birth to 12 million babies last year, down from 14.65 million in 2019, marking an 18 per cent decline year on year. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Adair Turner

Adair Turner

Adair Turner, chair of the Energy Transitions Commission, was chair of the UK Financial Services Authority from 2008 to 2013. He is the author of many books, including Between Debt and the Devil.