People shop at a duty-free shopping mall in Sanya, in China’s Hainan province, in October 2020. Foreign companies have been keen to tap China’s consumer market, but geopolitical tensions have complicated the picture. Photo: Xinhua
People shop at a duty-free shopping mall in Sanya, in China’s Hainan province, in October 2020. Foreign companies have been keen to tap China’s consumer market, but geopolitical tensions have complicated the picture. Photo: Xinhua
Benjamin Poon
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Benjamin Poon and Zhigang Tao

China’s anti-sanctions law: how companies can avoid picking a side

  • If the new law is similar to the European Union’s ‘blocking statute’, it may force companies to choose between the US or the Chinese market or motivate them to lobby the US to lift sanctions on China
  • A third option might be for companies to split into two separate entities serving both markets

People shop at a duty-free shopping mall in Sanya, in China’s Hainan province, in October 2020. Foreign companies have been keen to tap China’s consumer market, but geopolitical tensions have complicated the picture. Photo: Xinhua
People shop at a duty-free shopping mall in Sanya, in China’s Hainan province, in October 2020. Foreign companies have been keen to tap China’s consumer market, but geopolitical tensions have complicated the picture. Photo: Xinhua
READ FULL ARTICLE