A smart phone screen displays a new policy on Covid-19 misinformation with a Facebook website in the background. Facebook is one of the digital platforms that have adopted the Australian Code of Practice on Disinformation and Misinformation. Such voluntary codes are an essential tool in fighting fake news. Photo: AFP
A smart phone screen displays a new policy on Covid-19 misinformation with a Facebook website in the background. Facebook is one of the digital platforms that have adopted the Australian Code of Practice on Disinformation and Misinformation. Such voluntary codes are an essential tool in fighting fake news. Photo: AFP
Jeff Paine
Opinion

Opinion

Jeff Paine

Blunt laws can’t eradicate fake news at its root, but education and other tools can

  • Legislation is open to abuse and can stifle innovation. More importantly, it cannot effectively fight the complex issue of misinformation, given the scale of the internet
  • Collaborative efforts to set up fact-checking programmes and voluntary codes, invest in digital literacy training, and develop tech tools to flag fake news are a better solution

A smart phone screen displays a new policy on Covid-19 misinformation with a Facebook website in the background. Facebook is one of the digital platforms that have adopted the Australian Code of Practice on Disinformation and Misinformation. Such voluntary codes are an essential tool in fighting fake news. Photo: AFP
A smart phone screen displays a new policy on Covid-19 misinformation with a Facebook website in the background. Facebook is one of the digital platforms that have adopted the Australian Code of Practice on Disinformation and Misinformation. Such voluntary codes are an essential tool in fighting fake news. Photo: AFP
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