Emissions from a Uniper energy company coal-fired power plant and a BP refinery billow towards a wind turbine in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on January 16, 2020. Photo: AP Emissions from a Uniper energy company coal-fired power plant and a BP refinery billow towards a wind turbine in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on January 16, 2020. Photo: AP
Emissions from a Uniper energy company coal-fired power plant and a BP refinery billow towards a wind turbine in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on January 16, 2020. Photo: AP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Why China must beware of climate change measures aimed at stifling its rise

  • The shift to zero-carbon economies will occur over decades in which it is clear the China-US relationship will be characterised by competition
  • Measures such as carbon taxes adopted in the name of halting climate change could also be a covert way to contain China’s economic growth

Emissions from a Uniper energy company coal-fired power plant and a BP refinery billow towards a wind turbine in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on January 16, 2020. Photo: AP Emissions from a Uniper energy company coal-fired power plant and a BP refinery billow towards a wind turbine in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on January 16, 2020. Photo: AP
Emissions from a Uniper energy company coal-fired power plant and a BP refinery billow towards a wind turbine in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on January 16, 2020. Photo: AP
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.