A girl takes a picture of artificial full moons installed at a park as a wish to overcome the coronavirus pandemic and celebrate the Chuseok holiday, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, in Seoul, South Korea, on September 21, 2020. While national rivalries fostered innovation during the Cold War space race, they can also stymie it. Photo: Reuters A girl takes a picture of artificial full moons installed at a park as a wish to overcome the coronavirus pandemic and celebrate the Chuseok holiday, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, in Seoul, South Korea, on September 21, 2020. While national rivalries fostered innovation during the Cold War space race, they can also stymie it. Photo: Reuters
A girl takes a picture of artificial full moons installed at a park as a wish to overcome the coronavirus pandemic and celebrate the Chuseok holiday, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, in Seoul, South Korea, on September 21, 2020. While national rivalries fostered innovation during the Cold War space race, they can also stymie it. Photo: Reuters
Asit K. Biswas
Opinion

Opinion

Asit K. Biswas and Kris Hartley

What the coronavirus vaccine roll-out says about innovation in an age of geopolitical rivalry

  • While competition can foster innovation, in the current global crisis, concerns about intellectual property protection and efforts to cultivate diplomatic loyalties through vaccine provision can obstruct the type of cross-border collaboration needed

A girl takes a picture of artificial full moons installed at a park as a wish to overcome the coronavirus pandemic and celebrate the Chuseok holiday, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, in Seoul, South Korea, on September 21, 2020. While national rivalries fostered innovation during the Cold War space race, they can also stymie it. Photo: Reuters A girl takes a picture of artificial full moons installed at a park as a wish to overcome the coronavirus pandemic and celebrate the Chuseok holiday, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, in Seoul, South Korea, on September 21, 2020. While national rivalries fostered innovation during the Cold War space race, they can also stymie it. Photo: Reuters
A girl takes a picture of artificial full moons installed at a park as a wish to overcome the coronavirus pandemic and celebrate the Chuseok holiday, the Korean Thanksgiving Day, in Seoul, South Korea, on September 21, 2020. While national rivalries fostered innovation during the Cold War space race, they can also stymie it. Photo: Reuters
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Asit K. Biswas

Asit K. Biswas

Asit K. Biswas is Distinguished Visiting Professor of Engineering at the University of Glasgow.

Kris Hartley

Kris Hartley

Kris Hartley is an assistant professor of public policy at The Education University of Hong Kong.