A celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party at Tiananmen Square in Beijing on July 1. Few Westerners see the irony of a supposedly closed China celebrating the centenary of the Communist Party, when communism was born but essentially rejected in the West. Photo: Kyodo
A celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party at Tiananmen Square in Beijing on July 1. Few Westerners see the irony of a supposedly closed China celebrating the centenary of the Communist Party, when communism was born but essentially rejected in the West. Photo: Kyodo
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Why China embraced Marxism but not other Western thinking

  • In the early 20th century, the Chinese understood that the rebuilding of China after the collapse of the old order would be a monumental task
  • Marx provided historical and political perspectives on how capitalism would evolve, and a concept of dialectics that was almost Chinese

A celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party at Tiananmen Square in Beijing on July 1. Few Westerners see the irony of a supposedly closed China celebrating the centenary of the Communist Party, when communism was born but essentially rejected in the West. Photo: Kyodo
A celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party at Tiananmen Square in Beijing on July 1. Few Westerners see the irony of a supposedly closed China celebrating the centenary of the Communist Party, when communism was born but essentially rejected in the West. Photo: Kyodo
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