Men ride their bicycles in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog, in New Delhi, India, on October 24, 2020. A UN report projects New Delhi will overtake Tokyo as the world’s most populated mega-city in 2030. Photo: Reuters Men ride their bicycles in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog, in New Delhi, India, on October 24, 2020. A UN report projects New Delhi will overtake Tokyo as the world’s most populated mega-city in 2030. Photo: Reuters
Men ride their bicycles in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog, in New Delhi, India, on October 24, 2020. A UN report projects New Delhi will overtake Tokyo as the world’s most populated mega-city in 2030. Photo: Reuters
Andrew Hammond
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Hammond

As climate change makes itself felt through heatwaves and floods, are our mega-cities ready?

  • World Population Day is an occasion to reflect on how the world can best address the challenges posed by the combination of urbanisation and climate change

Men ride their bicycles in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog, in New Delhi, India, on October 24, 2020. A UN report projects New Delhi will overtake Tokyo as the world’s most populated mega-city in 2030. Photo: Reuters Men ride their bicycles in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog, in New Delhi, India, on October 24, 2020. A UN report projects New Delhi will overtake Tokyo as the world’s most populated mega-city in 2030. Photo: Reuters
Men ride their bicycles in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog, in New Delhi, India, on October 24, 2020. A UN report projects New Delhi will overtake Tokyo as the world’s most populated mega-city in 2030. Photo: Reuters
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Andrew Hammond

Andrew Hammond

Andrew Hammond is an associate at LSE IDEAS (the Centre for International Affairs, Diplomacy and Strategy) at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He was formerly a UK goverment special adviser at a time when Britain last held the presidency of the European Union.