For many young people in Hong Kong, employment prospects are challenging, inequality more pronounced and social connections that form the basis of emotional and mental strength significantly atrophied. Photo: EPA-EFE For many young people in Hong Kong, employment prospects are challenging, inequality more pronounced and social connections that form the basis of emotional and mental strength significantly atrophied. Photo: EPA-EFE
For many young people in Hong Kong, employment prospects are challenging, inequality more pronounced and social connections that form the basis of emotional and mental strength significantly atrophied. Photo: EPA-EFE
David S. Lee
Opinion

Opinion

The View by David S. Lee

Hong Kong’s future depends on companies finding purpose beyond profits

  • A hypercompetitive environment, slumping wages, costly housing and more have left Hong Kong youth depressed and despairing over their future
  • Firms must put forth rationales and business models that move beyond focusing on profit so we can craft a better life for future generations and inspire hope

For many young people in Hong Kong, employment prospects are challenging, inequality more pronounced and social connections that form the basis of emotional and mental strength significantly atrophied. Photo: EPA-EFE For many young people in Hong Kong, employment prospects are challenging, inequality more pronounced and social connections that form the basis of emotional and mental strength significantly atrophied. Photo: EPA-EFE
For many young people in Hong Kong, employment prospects are challenging, inequality more pronounced and social connections that form the basis of emotional and mental strength significantly atrophied. Photo: EPA-EFE
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David S. Lee

David S. Lee

David S. Lee is a senior lecturer at the University of Hong Kong’s Faculty of Business and Economics.