People shop at a supermarket in Beijing on July 9. China’s GDP in the second quarter grew less than analysts expected, triggering calls for further monetary and fiscal policy stimulus. Photo: EPA-EFE People shop at a supermarket in Beijing on July 9. China’s GDP in the second quarter grew less than analysts expected, triggering calls for further monetary and fiscal policy stimulus. Photo: EPA-EFE
People shop at a supermarket in Beijing on July 9. China’s GDP in the second quarter grew less than analysts expected, triggering calls for further monetary and fiscal policy stimulus. Photo: EPA-EFE
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Nicholas Spiro

Why a slowdown in China’s economic recovery is no cause for market jitters

  • Worries about global growth stem mainly from economic and virus-related developments in the US and Europe rather than Chinese weakness
  • Rather than signal growth is under threat, monetary easing in China is part of policymakers’ economic balancing act of supporting growth while curbing financial risks

People shop at a supermarket in Beijing on July 9. China’s GDP in the second quarter grew less than analysts expected, triggering calls for further monetary and fiscal policy stimulus. Photo: EPA-EFE People shop at a supermarket in Beijing on July 9. China’s GDP in the second quarter grew less than analysts expected, triggering calls for further monetary and fiscal policy stimulus. Photo: EPA-EFE
People shop at a supermarket in Beijing on July 9. China’s GDP in the second quarter grew less than analysts expected, triggering calls for further monetary and fiscal policy stimulus. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.