The Hong Kong Legislative Council building in Tamar. While the national security law includes some crimes contained in Article 23, it does not purport to be comprehensive. It’s now up to Hong Kong to ensure national security is protected in all areas. Photo: May Tse The Hong Kong Legislative Council building in Tamar. While the national security law includes some crimes contained in Article 23, it does not purport to be comprehensive. It’s now up to Hong Kong to ensure national security is protected in all areas. Photo: May Tse
The Hong Kong Legislative Council building in Tamar. While the national security law includes some crimes contained in Article 23, it does not purport to be comprehensive. It’s now up to Hong Kong to ensure national security is protected in all areas. Photo: May Tse
Grenville Cross
Opinion

Opinion

Grenville Cross

Article 23: when treason laws still refer to the queen, a national security law update is way overdue

  • Beijing has done the heavy lifting: the national security law addresses secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces. But Hong Kong still has to update its own laws on treason, sedition and theft of state secrets

The Hong Kong Legislative Council building in Tamar. While the national security law includes some crimes contained in Article 23, it does not purport to be comprehensive. It’s now up to Hong Kong to ensure national security is protected in all areas. Photo: May Tse The Hong Kong Legislative Council building in Tamar. While the national security law includes some crimes contained in Article 23, it does not purport to be comprehensive. It’s now up to Hong Kong to ensure national security is protected in all areas. Photo: May Tse
The Hong Kong Legislative Council building in Tamar. While the national security law includes some crimes contained in Article 23, it does not purport to be comprehensive. It’s now up to Hong Kong to ensure national security is protected in all areas. Photo: May Tse
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Grenville Cross

Grenville Cross

Grenville Cross SC is a criminal justice analyst, a barrister (Queen’s counsel and senior counsel), and vice-chairman of the senate of the International Association of Prosecutors. He is sentencing editor of Hong Kong Cases and Archbold Hong Kong, and co-author of Sentencing in Hong Kong. He was the director of public prosecutions from 1997 to 2009.