Satellite imagery taken on March 23 from Maxar Technologies shows Chinese vessels anchored at the Whitsun Reef, a feature in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Photo: AFP Satellite imagery taken on March 23 from Maxar Technologies shows Chinese vessels anchored at the Whitsun Reef, a feature in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Photo: AFP
Satellite imagery taken on March 23 from Maxar Technologies shows Chinese vessels anchored at the Whitsun Reef, a feature in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Photo: AFP
Mark J. Valencia
Opinion

Opinion

Mark J. Valencia

South China Sea: why report on Chinese boats dumping sewage doesn’t hold water

  • The report concludes too much based on remote sensing, without confirming its findings with on-site observation
  • The suggestion that damage to the coral threatens the food security of coastal states is based on unproven assumptions about the Spratlys as a genetic ‘savings bank’

Satellite imagery taken on March 23 from Maxar Technologies shows Chinese vessels anchored at the Whitsun Reef, a feature in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Photo: AFP Satellite imagery taken on March 23 from Maxar Technologies shows Chinese vessels anchored at the Whitsun Reef, a feature in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Photo: AFP
Satellite imagery taken on March 23 from Maxar Technologies shows Chinese vessels anchored at the Whitsun Reef, a feature in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Photo: AFP
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