A flyer lies on the ground in support of Leon Tong Ying-kit, the first person convicted under the Hong Kong national security law, near the High Court in Hong Kong on July 30. Tong was sentenced to nine years in prison for driving his motorcycle into a group of police officers last year while flying a flag calling for the city’s “liberation”. Photo: EPA-EFE
A flyer lies on the ground in support of Leon Tong Ying-kit, the first person convicted under the Hong Kong national security law, near the High Court in Hong Kong on July 30. Tong was sentenced to nine years in prison for driving his motorcycle into a group of police officers last year while flying a flag calling for the city’s “liberation”. Photo: EPA-EFE
Michael C. Davis
Opinion

Opinion

Michael C. Davis

National security trial ruling a setback for human rights in Hong Kong

  • Under the standard applied, just about any slogan that might possibly bear a meaning that is prohibited could then be judged unlawful and result in jail time
  • Pursuing the charge of grievous bodily harm rather than terrorism would have been supported by the evidence and not caused fears over human rights in Hong Kong

A flyer lies on the ground in support of Leon Tong Ying-kit, the first person convicted under the Hong Kong national security law, near the High Court in Hong Kong on July 30. Tong was sentenced to nine years in prison for driving his motorcycle into a group of police officers last year while flying a flag calling for the city’s “liberation”. Photo: EPA-EFE
A flyer lies on the ground in support of Leon Tong Ying-kit, the first person convicted under the Hong Kong national security law, near the High Court in Hong Kong on July 30. Tong was sentenced to nine years in prison for driving his motorcycle into a group of police officers last year while flying a flag calling for the city’s “liberation”. Photo: EPA-EFE
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