Visitors to a store in the Nanluoguxiang shopping area in Beijing have their temperature checked on August 8. The general outlook seems compatible with the Chinese economy stabilising into a 5.5 to 6.5 per cent growth range, once output volatility settles down. Photo: Bloomberg Visitors to a store in the Nanluoguxiang shopping area in Beijing have their temperature checked on August 8. The general outlook seems compatible with the Chinese economy stabilising into a 5.5 to 6.5 per cent growth range, once output volatility settles down. Photo: Bloomberg
Visitors to a store in the Nanluoguxiang shopping area in Beijing have their temperature checked on August 8. The general outlook seems compatible with the Chinese economy stabilising into a 5.5 to 6.5 per cent growth range, once output volatility settles down. Photo: Bloomberg
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

Why the next move for China’s interest rates should be up, not down

  • The economic slowdown is consistent with longer-term trends of GDP stabilising to a more sustainable 6 per cent growth
  • There’s no need for Beijing to panic – it has done enough and anyway can ill-afford to cut rates just when the Fed is expected to tighten policy

Visitors to a store in the Nanluoguxiang shopping area in Beijing have their temperature checked on August 8. The general outlook seems compatible with the Chinese economy stabilising into a 5.5 to 6.5 per cent growth range, once output volatility settles down. Photo: Bloomberg Visitors to a store in the Nanluoguxiang shopping area in Beijing have their temperature checked on August 8. The general outlook seems compatible with the Chinese economy stabilising into a 5.5 to 6.5 per cent growth range, once output volatility settles down. Photo: Bloomberg
Visitors to a store in the Nanluoguxiang shopping area in Beijing have their temperature checked on August 8. The general outlook seems compatible with the Chinese economy stabilising into a 5.5 to 6.5 per cent growth range, once output volatility settles down. Photo: Bloomberg
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