North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (left) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in enjoy a light moment in the Peace House at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone on April 27, 2018. Moon appears anxious to leave a legacy of North-South amity when he steps down next year. Photo: AP
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (left) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in enjoy a light moment in the Peace House at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone on April 27, 2018. Moon appears anxious to leave a legacy of North-South amity when he steps down next year. Photo: AP
Donald Kirk
Opinion

Opinion

Donald Kirk

Korean peace treaty advocates are chasing an absurd, destructive dream

  • Demands for negotiations on a treaty are part of a bill in the US Congress that ignores North Korean human rights violations and its nuclear missile programme
  • Those pushing for a treaty assume all sides must agree first to ending the Korean war, which North Korea shows no interest in doing

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (left) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in enjoy a light moment in the Peace House at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone on April 27, 2018. Moon appears anxious to leave a legacy of North-South amity when he steps down next year. Photo: AP
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un (left) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in enjoy a light moment in the Peace House at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone on April 27, 2018. Moon appears anxious to leave a legacy of North-South amity when he steps down next year. Photo: AP
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