A hawk flies over a tract of burnt Amazon jungle near Porto Velho, Rondonia, Brazil in August 2020. The financial burden of conserving the  forests of Indonesia, Central Africa and the Amazon should not be placed on their populations who are most vulnerable to climate change. Photo: Reuters
A hawk flies over a tract of burnt Amazon jungle near Porto Velho, Rondonia, Brazil in August 2020. The financial burden of conserving the forests of Indonesia, Central Africa and the Amazon should not be placed on their populations who are most vulnerable to climate change. Photo: Reuters
Charles Bedford
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Charles Bedford

The rich world isn’t helping the developing world decarbonise. Time for carbon markets to step in

  • Amid climate inaction, a voluntary carbon market where companies and individuals pay for tree planting and renewable energy projects has sprung up
  • Through these markets, the developed world can and should pay communities in the developing world to stop cutting down forests and switch to renewables

A hawk flies over a tract of burnt Amazon jungle near Porto Velho, Rondonia, Brazil in August 2020. The financial burden of conserving the  forests of Indonesia, Central Africa and the Amazon should not be placed on their populations who are most vulnerable to climate change. Photo: Reuters
A hawk flies over a tract of burnt Amazon jungle near Porto Velho, Rondonia, Brazil in August 2020. The financial burden of conserving the forests of Indonesia, Central Africa and the Amazon should not be placed on their populations who are most vulnerable to climate change. Photo: Reuters
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