Farmers sort out freshly harvested potatoes in a field in Fengping in the Chinese province of Yunnan on March 16. In China, land banking has been primarily used by local governments to expropriate rural land that is still being productively used for agriculture. Photo: Xinhua Farmers sort out freshly harvested potatoes in a field in Fengping in the Chinese province of Yunnan on March 16. In China, land banking has been primarily used by local governments to expropriate rural land that is still being productively used for agriculture. Photo: Xinhua
Farmers sort out freshly harvested potatoes in a field in Fengping in the Chinese province of Yunnan on March 16. In China, land banking has been primarily used by local governments to expropriate rural land that is still being productively used for agriculture. Photo: Xinhua
Li Ping
Opinion

Opinion

Li Ping

How China’s landmark law changes help protect farmland and farmers’ rights

  • Rapid urbanisation has put farmers’ land increasingly in the crosshairs of developers
  • Two recent changes to Chinese land laws seek to address land expropriation, and represent a milestone in protecting farmers from unjust practices

Farmers sort out freshly harvested potatoes in a field in Fengping in the Chinese province of Yunnan on March 16. In China, land banking has been primarily used by local governments to expropriate rural land that is still being productively used for agriculture. Photo: Xinhua Farmers sort out freshly harvested potatoes in a field in Fengping in the Chinese province of Yunnan on March 16. In China, land banking has been primarily used by local governments to expropriate rural land that is still being productively used for agriculture. Photo: Xinhua
Farmers sort out freshly harvested potatoes in a field in Fengping in the Chinese province of Yunnan on March 16. In China, land banking has been primarily used by local governments to expropriate rural land that is still being productively used for agriculture. Photo: Xinhua
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