Young people wait for a ride at a public transport stop in Quezon City, the Philippines, on November 10, 2020. Youth unemployment in the country hit 22 per cent last year. Photo: EPA-EFE
Young people wait for a ride at a public transport stop in Quezon City, the Philippines, on November 10, 2020. Youth unemployment in the country hit 22 per cent last year. Photo: EPA-EFE
Laura Guay
Opinion

Opinion

Laura Guay and David B. Young

Asian youth, hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic, should have a voice to decide their future

  • Young people are struggling with online schooling, a volatile job market and mental health challenges
  • Some have chosen to speak up to help their communities. This should be encouraged by giving youth opportunities to engage in policymaking

Young people wait for a ride at a public transport stop in Quezon City, the Philippines, on November 10, 2020. Youth unemployment in the country hit 22 per cent last year. Photo: EPA-EFE
Young people wait for a ride at a public transport stop in Quezon City, the Philippines, on November 10, 2020. Youth unemployment in the country hit 22 per cent last year. Photo: EPA-EFE
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