Smoke and steam billow from a coal-fired power plant owned by Indonesia Power in Suralaya, Indonesia, on July 11, 2020. Despite global efforts to promote a shift to renewable energy, fossil fuels such as coal are still a cheap, reliable power source for developing countries. Photo: Reuters
Smoke and steam billow from a coal-fired power plant owned by Indonesia Power in Suralaya, Indonesia, on July 11, 2020. Despite global efforts to promote a shift to renewable energy, fossil fuels such as coal are still a cheap, reliable power source for developing countries. Photo: Reuters
Nicki Tilney
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Nicki Tilney

Climate change: why hastening Asia’s shift to green energy will not be easy

  • Perceived risks to economic growth, delays in enacting green policies and reluctance to abandon cheap, reliable fossil fuels are slowing Asia’s transition
  • Asia is central to the global green energy agenda, so efforts must include policies that help developing countries afford the shift

Smoke and steam billow from a coal-fired power plant owned by Indonesia Power in Suralaya, Indonesia, on July 11, 2020. Despite global efforts to promote a shift to renewable energy, fossil fuels such as coal are still a cheap, reliable power source for developing countries. Photo: Reuters
Smoke and steam billow from a coal-fired power plant owned by Indonesia Power in Suralaya, Indonesia, on July 11, 2020. Despite global efforts to promote a shift to renewable energy, fossil fuels such as coal are still a cheap, reliable power source for developing countries. Photo: Reuters
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