Indigeneous Fynbos flowers grow at the African National Biodiversity Institute’s Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden, in Cape Town, South Africa, on October 24. The pharmaceutical industry uses as many as 70,000 different species of plants, but unchecked development and economic expansion have led to biosphere degradation that could do serious harm to planetary and human health. Photo: EPA-EFE
Indigeneous Fynbos flowers grow at the African National Biodiversity Institute’s Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden, in Cape Town, South Africa, on October 24. The pharmaceutical industry uses as many as 70,000 different species of plants, but unchecked development and economic expansion have led to biosphere degradation that could do serious harm to planetary and human health. Photo: EPA-EFE
Laurent Ramsey
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Laurent Ramsey

Companies need to target net zero on biodiversity loss, not just climate change

  • Given the intimate relationship between climate and the biosphere, the two crises can only be tackled together
  • The private sector’s role should not be limited to risk mitigation and transparent reporting – capital expenditure can be redirected to repair damage to the ecosystem

Indigeneous Fynbos flowers grow at the African National Biodiversity Institute’s Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden, in Cape Town, South Africa, on October 24. The pharmaceutical industry uses as many as 70,000 different species of plants, but unchecked development and economic expansion have led to biosphere degradation that could do serious harm to planetary and human health. Photo: EPA-EFE
Indigeneous Fynbos flowers grow at the African National Biodiversity Institute’s Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden, in Cape Town, South Africa, on October 24. The pharmaceutical industry uses as many as 70,000 different species of plants, but unchecked development and economic expansion have led to biosphere degradation that could do serious harm to planetary and human health. Photo: EPA-EFE
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