Young people look across Victoria Harbour from the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade on November 1. Hong Kong’s Basic Law, which came into force in 1997, states that the city’s “previous capitalist system and way of life shall remain unchanged for 50 years”. Photo: Felix Wong
Young people look across Victoria Harbour from the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade on November 1. Hong Kong’s Basic Law, which came into force in 1997, states that the city’s “previous capitalist system and way of life shall remain unchanged for 50 years”. Photo: Felix Wong
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Time for Hong Kong to craft a strategic pathway to 2047

  • Non-interventionism is no longer a fit credo for Hong Kong as it competes with mainland cities that follow a state-market partnership model
  • The real social issue facing Hong Kong is a conflicted identity, which has sowed division. To promote healing, policymakers must address social inequality, starting with housing

Young people look across Victoria Harbour from the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade on November 1. Hong Kong’s Basic Law, which came into force in 1997, states that the city’s “previous capitalist system and way of life shall remain unchanged for 50 years”. Photo: Felix Wong
Young people look across Victoria Harbour from the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade on November 1. Hong Kong’s Basic Law, which came into force in 1997, states that the city’s “previous capitalist system and way of life shall remain unchanged for 50 years”. Photo: Felix Wong
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