A person in protective overalls works near containers on a ship in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Supply chain issues have forced some exporters to resort to air freight, which can cost 10 times as much as shipping by sea. Photo: AP
A person in protective overalls works near containers on a ship in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Supply chain issues have forced some exporters to resort to air freight, which can cost 10 times as much as shipping by sea. Photo: AP
Charlie Grahn
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Charlie Grahn

Behind the global supply chain crisis is a simple case of hubris

  • While many claim to have identified the reason for the logistical disruptions, the true cause is that most human of errors – believing the past will simply repeat itself
  • Because today’s supply chains are global, efficient and more perilously constituted than before, new risk mitigation systems are needed

A person in protective overalls works near containers on a ship in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Supply chain issues have forced some exporters to resort to air freight, which can cost 10 times as much as shipping by sea. Photo: AP
A person in protective overalls works near containers on a ship in Qingdao, in east China’s Shandong province. Supply chain issues have forced some exporters to resort to air freight, which can cost 10 times as much as shipping by sea. Photo: AP
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