A vendor loads up bags of onions at a market in Shenyang, in China’s northeastern Liaoning province, on December 9. Pork prices may have fallen but the cost of other food products is spiking in China, with fresh vegetables up by 30.6 per cent in November from a year ago. Photo: AFP
A vendor loads up bags of onions at a market in Shenyang, in China’s northeastern Liaoning province, on December 9. Pork prices may have fallen but the cost of other food products is spiking in China, with fresh vegetables up by 30.6 per cent in November from a year ago. Photo: AFP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Why China should worry about food price inflation despite November’s modest rise

  • Plummeting pork prices have helped offset increases in other foods. But with the rising cost of food a global issue, plus high energy prices that will hit food production, Beijing officials must remain vigilant

A vendor loads up bags of onions at a market in Shenyang, in China’s northeastern Liaoning province, on December 9. Pork prices may have fallen but the cost of other food products is spiking in China, with fresh vegetables up by 30.6 per cent in November from a year ago. Photo: AFP
A vendor loads up bags of onions at a market in Shenyang, in China’s northeastern Liaoning province, on December 9. Pork prices may have fallen but the cost of other food products is spiking in China, with fresh vegetables up by 30.6 per cent in November from a year ago. Photo: AFP
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