A worker unloads relief goods in Cebu, in the Philippines, on December 19. While there is a clear imperative for providing emergency relief funds, long-term foreign aid projects often fail to meet their aims because of short-sighted planning. Photo: EPA-EFE
A worker unloads relief goods in Cebu, in the Philippines, on December 19. While there is a clear imperative for providing emergency relief funds, long-term foreign aid projects often fail to meet their aims because of short-sighted planning. Photo: EPA-EFE
Mukhtar Karim
Opinion

Opinion

Mukhtar Karim

Rich countries are pledging funds to help poorer nations fight climate change, but does foreign aid actually work?

  • Developing countries will suffer disproportionately from the effects of climate change, but have been promised only half the funds the UN says are needed for them to adapt
  • Yet, even when money is granted, failed initiatives show that it does not always solve problems

A worker unloads relief goods in Cebu, in the Philippines, on December 19. While there is a clear imperative for providing emergency relief funds, long-term foreign aid projects often fail to meet their aims because of short-sighted planning. Photo: EPA-EFE
A worker unloads relief goods in Cebu, in the Philippines, on December 19. While there is a clear imperative for providing emergency relief funds, long-term foreign aid projects often fail to meet their aims because of short-sighted planning. Photo: EPA-EFE
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