Workers return home from an electrical and electronics industrial zone at Sungei Way Free Trade Zone, in Petaling Jaya, Selangor, on June 10. Labour productivity growth has averaged 1.1 per cent in Malaysia in the past five years. Photo: Reuters
Workers return home from an electrical and electronics industrial zone at Sungei Way Free Trade Zone, in Petaling Jaya, Selangor, on June 10. Labour productivity growth has averaged 1.1 per cent in Malaysia in the past five years. Photo: Reuters
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Malaysia’s economic challenge shows how politics has become a bottleneck for growth

  • Even as emerging market economies like Malaysia grapple with the repercussions of the pandemic and Ukraine war, they tend to put off the more difficult structural adjustments necessary for growth
  • In Malaysia, meagre private-sector investment stems from a lack of confidence in government policies on labour, education and training, and its commitment to inclusive development

Workers return home from an electrical and electronics industrial zone at Sungei Way Free Trade Zone, in Petaling Jaya, Selangor, on June 10. Labour productivity growth has averaged 1.1 per cent in Malaysia in the past five years. Photo: Reuters
Workers return home from an electrical and electronics industrial zone at Sungei Way Free Trade Zone, in Petaling Jaya, Selangor, on June 10. Labour productivity growth has averaged 1.1 per cent in Malaysia in the past five years. Photo: Reuters
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