An artist prepares for a Chinese opera performance backstage in a temporary bamboo theatre during a Taoist festival in Shek O on November 10, 2016. Both traditional opera and the building of bamboo theatres are listed in Hong Kong’s Intangible Cultural Heritage Database. Photo: Nora Tam
An artist prepares for a Chinese opera performance backstage in a temporary bamboo theatre during a Taoist festival in Shek O on November 10, 2016. Both traditional opera and the building of bamboo theatres are listed in Hong Kong’s Intangible Cultural Heritage Database. Photo: Nora Tam
Helen So
Opinion

Opinion

Helen So and Yolanda Lam

Preserving Hong Kong’s cultural heritage must start with documenting it

  • The capsizing of Jumbo Floating Restaurant and the upended fate of a timber factory with post-war roots have renewed discussion about cultural heritage
  • If we are to know what cultural assets we have and determine what is worth saving, documentation and digitalisation is a necessary step

An artist prepares for a Chinese opera performance backstage in a temporary bamboo theatre during a Taoist festival in Shek O on November 10, 2016. Both traditional opera and the building of bamboo theatres are listed in Hong Kong’s Intangible Cultural Heritage Database. Photo: Nora Tam
An artist prepares for a Chinese opera performance backstage in a temporary bamboo theatre during a Taoist festival in Shek O on November 10, 2016. Both traditional opera and the building of bamboo theatres are listed in Hong Kong’s Intangible Cultural Heritage Database. Photo: Nora Tam
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