A Russian military convoy travels towards the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station, in southeastern Ukraine, on May 1. Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of shelling Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, stoking international fears of a catastrophe on the continent. Photo: AP
A Russian military convoy travels towards the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station, in southeastern Ukraine, on May 1. Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of shelling Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, stoking international fears of a catastrophe on the continent. Photo: AP
Peter Wynn Kirby
Opinion

Opinion

Peter Wynn Kirby

Putin’s ‘atrocity exhibition’ could turn Ukraine’s nuclear plants into deadly weapons

  • Russia’s cavalier conduct around Ukrainian nuclear facilities is in keeping with its disregard for the rules of war and basic decency
  • There are now fears the Kremlin could order the detonation of a nuclear reactor or spent-fuel stores while pinning the blame on Ukraine

A Russian military convoy travels towards the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station, in southeastern Ukraine, on May 1. Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of shelling Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, stoking international fears of a catastrophe on the continent. Photo: AP
A Russian military convoy travels towards the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station, in southeastern Ukraine, on May 1. Russia and Ukraine have accused each other of shelling Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, stoking international fears of a catastrophe on the continent. Photo: AP
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