A farmer walks past murals and posters depicting ethnic minority residents studying the constitution with slogans reading “Unity and stability is fortune, separatism and turmoil is misfortune” near Kashgar, Xinjiang, on March 19, 2021. Photo: AP
A farmer walks past murals and posters depicting ethnic minority residents studying the constitution with slogans reading “Unity and stability is fortune, separatism and turmoil is misfortune” near Kashgar, Xinjiang, on March 19, 2021. Photo: AP
Ronny Tong
Opinion

Opinion

Ronny Tong

UN report on Xinjiang goes too far in its conclusions

  • In the absence of convincing facts and arguments, it is difficult to understand how the mere enactment of a legal regime on terrorism can constitute a crime against humanity
  • The report also relies too heavily on the testimonies of self-declared victims and their family members

A farmer walks past murals and posters depicting ethnic minority residents studying the constitution with slogans reading “Unity and stability is fortune, separatism and turmoil is misfortune” near Kashgar, Xinjiang, on March 19, 2021. Photo: AP
A farmer walks past murals and posters depicting ethnic minority residents studying the constitution with slogans reading “Unity and stability is fortune, separatism and turmoil is misfortune” near Kashgar, Xinjiang, on March 19, 2021. Photo: AP
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