Türkiye’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at a Nato summit news conference in Madrid, Spain, on June 30. The country is a key example of how reforms have boosted the power of the executive to better protect national interests. Photo: Reuters
Türkiye’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at a Nato summit news conference in Madrid, Spain, on June 30. The country is a key example of how reforms have boosted the power of the executive to better protect national interests. Photo: Reuters
Alp Sevimlisoy
Opinion

Opinion

Alp Sevimlisoy and Peter Woodard

From US to UK, less politics and stronger leaders needed to meet pressing threats

  • In an increasingly uncertain world, people want strong leaders, with enough executive power to protect against threats to the unity of the nation and the Nato alliance
  • China stands in stark contrast to the US and UK, where executive power is hampered by bureaucracy and political infighting

Türkiye’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at a Nato summit news conference in Madrid, Spain, on June 30. The country is a key example of how reforms have boosted the power of the executive to better protect national interests. Photo: Reuters
Türkiye’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at a Nato summit news conference in Madrid, Spain, on June 30. The country is a key example of how reforms have boosted the power of the executive to better protect national interests. Photo: Reuters
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