A Royal Bahamas Police Force officer holds a trumpet during a ceremony to proclaim King Charles III as the new head of state of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas during a ceremony in Nassau, Bahamas, on September 11.  Photo: Reuters
A Royal Bahamas Police Force officer holds a trumpet during a ceremony to proclaim King Charles III as the new head of state of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas during a ceremony in Nassau, Bahamas, on September 11. Photo: Reuters
Syed Munir Khasru
Opinion

Opinion

Syed Munir Khasru

Under King Charles, the future of the Commonwealth looks uncertain

  • While fractures have long existed in the group of former British territories, they were more or less held together by the unifying power of Queen Elizabeth
  • As Charles takes on the hereditary role of head of the Commonwealth, many members will again question the value of the group and the legitimacy of its figurehead

A Royal Bahamas Police Force officer holds a trumpet during a ceremony to proclaim King Charles III as the new head of state of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas during a ceremony in Nassau, Bahamas, on September 11.  Photo: Reuters
A Royal Bahamas Police Force officer holds a trumpet during a ceremony to proclaim King Charles III as the new head of state of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas during a ceremony in Nassau, Bahamas, on September 11. Photo: Reuters
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