Afghan women hold their educational documents during a protest as they demand the Taliban government provide them with job opportunities in Kabul, Afghanistan, on October 31. The Taliban have banned women from many government jobs and forbidden secondary school education for girls.  Photo: EPA-EFE
Afghan women hold their educational documents during a protest as they demand the Taliban government provide them with job opportunities in Kabul, Afghanistan, on October 31. The Taliban have banned women from many government jobs and forbidden secondary school education for girls. Photo: EPA-EFE
Bhagyashri Dengle
Opinion

Opinion

Bhagyashri Dengle

Young women’s leadership in Asia is improving, but much work is left to do

  • There is reason to celebrate as over 70 per cent of Asia-Pacific countries showed improvement in opportunities for girls and young women to lead
  • Despite this progress, girls and women continue to be undervalued and underestimated throughout the region, even in the most developed countries

Afghan women hold their educational documents during a protest as they demand the Taliban government provide them with job opportunities in Kabul, Afghanistan, on October 31. The Taliban have banned women from many government jobs and forbidden secondary school education for girls.  Photo: EPA-EFE
Afghan women hold their educational documents during a protest as they demand the Taliban government provide them with job opportunities in Kabul, Afghanistan, on October 31. The Taliban have banned women from many government jobs and forbidden secondary school education for girls. Photo: EPA-EFE
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