Thousands of Muslims return home on an overcrowded train, after attending the final prayer of Bishwa Ijtema, the world’s second-largest Muslim gathering after the Haj, in Tongi, outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, on January 12, 2020. Photo: Reuters
Thousands of Muslims return home on an overcrowded train, after attending the final prayer of Bishwa Ijtema, the world’s second-largest Muslim gathering after the Haj, in Tongi, outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, on January 12, 2020. Photo: Reuters
Riccardo Puliti
Opinion

Opinion

Riccardo Puliti

How developing nations can get the infrastructure they need

  • There is no shortcut to efficient, climate-resilient infrastructure projects that attract investors, and pathways include country reforms and global cooperation
  • But countries must first chart their own paths and signal for change; only then can the World Bank step in to help secure financing

Thousands of Muslims return home on an overcrowded train, after attending the final prayer of Bishwa Ijtema, the world’s second-largest Muslim gathering after the Haj, in Tongi, outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, on January 12, 2020. Photo: Reuters
Thousands of Muslims return home on an overcrowded train, after attending the final prayer of Bishwa Ijtema, the world’s second-largest Muslim gathering after the Haj, in Tongi, outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, on January 12, 2020. Photo: Reuters
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